Friday, April 18, 2014

I’m proud to announce that I’m going to be the new multimedia intern at the Conservancy for the Cuyahoga Valley National Park this summer! I’m excited to be part of such a great organization and can’t wait to get started. 

Thursday, April 17, 2014
Tuesday, April 15, 2014
futurejournalismproject:

Thirteen-Year-Old Girl Showing Who’s Boss While Hunting With Eagle on Mongolian Mountain Top
Via BBC.

futurejournalismproject:

Thirteen-Year-Old Girl Showing Who’s Boss While Hunting With Eagle on Mongolian Mountain Top

Via BBC.

Monday, April 14, 2014

livelymorgue:

May 24, 1960: Sam Falk of The New York Times sought the perfect shot of an aquarium shark in a year when a Jersey Shore shark attack frightened the Metro area. The Times sought to set the record straight on Aug. 28: “Scientists point out there is less chance of a swimmer being attacked by a shark than struck by lightning.” And experts surmised that “there is no real increase, but merely more swimmers and sun bathers to report sighting of sharks” as well as “other large fish, which are often mistaken for sharks.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

Sunday, April 13, 2014

catsbeaversandducks:

Meerkats make the best photographer’s assistants EVER.

Via BuzzFeed

Thursday, April 10, 2014

(Source: jonwithabullet)

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

skunkbear:

A couple months ago I shared some GIFs of invisible things, and I finally got around to putting them together in this video:

When light travels through areas of different air density, it bends. You’ve probably noticed the way distant pavement seems to shimmer on a hot day, or the way stars appear to twinkle. You’re seeing light that has been distorted as it passes through varying air densities, which are in turn created by varying temperatures and pressures.

Schlieren Flow Visualization can be used to visually capture these changes in density: the rising heat from a candle, the turbulence around an airplane wing, the plume of a sneeze … even sound.  Special thanks to Mike Hargather, a professor of mechanical engineering at New Mexico Tech, who kindly provided a lot of these videos.

jammygummy:

"Space is big. Really big. You just won’t believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is.”

-Douglas Adams

(Source: ktt)

Monday, April 7, 2014